Basement water leakage can cause serious problems for a homeowner. Standing water can lead to mold growth, which poses health issues. It's also a haven for bugs and other pests. Over time, concrete blocks and foundations can sustain hairline cracks. While they may appear small on the surface, they can be the start of an enormous problem, so early repair is key. The only way to rectify a basement water problem is to remove the water and seal the leaks. This may involve removing existing paint or wall coverings as well as replacing soggy beams.
Putting down a floor in your basement offers a host of different options that will depend on your wants and needs more than anything else. Carpeting in the basement can easily be installed by any professional. Any type of carpeting can be installed in the basement and is often the most economical option. Another popular solution to flooring in the basement is the use of tile. Although tile is a more expensive option considering both material and labor costs, tile can be very visually appealing in your newly remodeled basement.
Sourcing supplies, clearing debris, and doing prep work can all help you save on basement costs. Consider what skills you have and talk with your contractor about what will shave money in each area. You may have the tools and strength to demo walls, which can save you several hundred dollars. Sourcing the materials for the pro takes this task off their labor time and saves you money. Doing prep work and finish work is also a way to cut down on total cost. Painting the walls yourself at the end of the project could save you hundreds of dollars. Negotiate all these aspects before signing your contract.

Your foundation should be inspected prior to finishing your basement. You don’t want to cover up any structural damage that would be identified in an inspection by installing framing and drywall. If items such as pipes have rust, the problem may be humidity instead of a leak, but it can be just as damaging. Waterproofing the basement and using a dehumidifier helps reduce dampness and the risk of mold development.


Running out of space in your home? Look down under. These homeowners found fresh square footage in their home by remodeling their basement into a budget-friendly, space-savvy hangout. An orange, green, and blue color scheme adds a bright look to the basement, while the combination of custom storage solutions with big-box finds creates a space that serves many needs.
Planning is the first stage with any basement bathroom installation. For a basement that's designed as a recreation room, work space, or kids' play area, a half-bath (stool and sink, but no shower or tub) is adequate. A basement with bedroom or en suite needs a full bathroom. Knowing how you plan to use the basement living space typically dictates the functional purpose of its bathroom.
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