Partitioning your basement into separate rooms transforms it from a storage and utility area to an inviting, warm living space. Framing the basement walls and ceilings makes a tremendous difference in the basement’s appeal. Installing interior walls in a large basement helps to hide expanses of empty space, instantly providing a feeling of coziness. Rooms that can be used for a media room, home office or bedroom will result in extra square footage, increasing the value of the home.

Simply finishing the floors, walls, and ceilings of the basement can help increase the value of your home. But putting extra thought into what you want to use the space for now, will save you on fees later. For example, if you intend to use this as a children’s playroom, then building shelves into the walls, adding egress windows, and putting down carpeting can all be done at the time of the remodel, rather than added later.

Finishing a basement ceiling can be a challenge as more than likely, you will need to work around duct, plumbing and electrical work, all while trying to maintain a comfortable room height. A qualified contractor may be able to reroute some of this hardware, but you will more likely lose some headroom to accommodate these fixtures in your finished basement.
Insulation will help to control the temperature and moisture, and it can act as an additional soundproofing agent. Spray-applied closed-cell foam insulation prices range from $700 to $4,000 or $32 – $80.50 per cubic square foot, per 1” of thickness sprayed. Foam is recommended for basement insulation because it is not air permeable—it won’t cause condensation to build up between the insulation and concrete walls.

Bedrooms – A common strategy is to set up a couple of extra bedrooms in the basement for guests. This is especially beneficial for families that love to entertain on a regular basis. You can easily have guests stay over without disrupting the family space above. Basement bedrooms can also come in handy if you have older kids that cannot share bedrooms any more. Plus, you could also add a small kitchenette and bathroom for convenience.
"We love that the basement now has a cozy feel yet is very on-trend and modern. It has doubled our square footage with very usable space and given us an additional bedroom and full bathroom. We used a beautiful door from the 1800s to line the wall behind the urinal in the bathroom, and we burned the cabinets in the dry bar and the bathroom countertop with a blowtorch to achieve a unique look. We lightly etched the concrete floors and then used a urethane, making a mirror-like finish that reflects light."
But the brilliant trick she employed to disguise the too-low ceiling was to paint the walls and ceiling the same color (Farrow & Ball, Elephant's Breath). Painting the ceiling white and the walls a different color would have created a horizontal line. The eye would use this line to establish the height of the ceiling. Instead, walls and ceiling blur together, making the ceiling look higher than it really is.
Simply finishing the floors, walls, and ceilings of the basement can help increase the value of your home. But putting extra thought into what you want to use the space for now, will save you on fees later. For example, if you intend to use this as a children’s playroom, then building shelves into the walls, adding egress windows, and putting down carpeting can all be done at the time of the remodel, rather than added later.
Add to this any custom work that you may want to have done to turn the basement into the type of room you have in mind, and the labor could continue to mount. Most people also find that they need a painter ($20-$35 per hour), and in older homes, asbestos 10 testing and removal ($1,500) is also recommended before the work can begin. For these reasons, many homeowners often choose to use a basement finishing system, which often has one set price for materials and labor (around $50,000 per basement) and decorate later as they choose.

In most cases, your HVAC system should already extend to the basement. If not, however, plan on running additional ducts or vents to ensure the finished rooms are adequately heated. Running new ductwork through your basement will cost around $2,000. Radiant heat is another option for basements, as it can be controlled separately and used only when the basement is. Radiant heat costs around $6,000 - $14,000 depending on the method used.


Increasing numbers of homeowners decide to enhance the existing concrete in their basement instead of covering it up. Stained and painted concrete floors offer many benefits, including their suitability for people with allergies. Skilled contractors can reproduce the look of slate, tile and marble, or they can apply dyes, paints and stencils in a variety of designs.
The average cost to install an HVAC system in the basement is $4,000 to $6,400 with new ductwork costing an additional $1,500 to $3,000. You might not have to install a separate HVAC system for the basement if the existing unit upstairs can handle the extra workload. If it can’t, then either upgrade your existing unit or install a second unit downstairs. You’ll have to install new ductwork and ventilation either way, unless you install a mini-split system.
This is great guys! Great work! I'm a retired kitchen guy so I know good work when I see it. I love all of it. My wife and I are doing a Farm kitchen right now as well. Your pictures have me thinking about sending in some before and after of ours. Just like you its the time we get to spend together during the project that makes the whole thing worth while. Great work. I cant say it enough!
Basement waterproofing costs about $1,480 for simple crack filling with an average of $2,000 to $6,000 for drainage improvements. Costs range from a minimum of $250 up to $20,000. Most homeowners waterproof after they discover water in the basement from poor drainage around the foundation and walls. Waterproofing will be a lower cost if it's included in a larger basement finishing project.
When it comes to basement remodels, the most costly way is to start with bare bones. If all you have is concrete walls and floors, you need to add framing, electrical, plumbing, flooring and trim. Basement finishing in a newer home that already has plumbing and electrical roughed in, a watertight foundation and some insulation installed—but no final finishes (like drywall or paint or carpet)—usually costs less than remodeling an already finished basement. This is because when you already have a finished basement, the pros will need to do demolition at the beginning of the project, which can add $500–$1,500 to overall costs.
Old homes may suffer from sagging foundation beams as a result of shifting ground or decay and deterioration of the original building materials. Foundation beams can be raised and shored up successfully, but the right tools, like a pneumatic jack, are essential. Depending on how much the foundation beam must be raised, this job may require several days of incremental steps to complete - which means increased labor costs. Hiring professionals is the best option for this job. Expect costs to run about $10,000 for repairs like a shifted foundation.
Homeowners in search of a warm, professional look for their basements often turn to drywall. Drywall ceilings help the basement look as good as upstairs living areas. Drywall can be treated with a variety of textures that are applied by roller or spray applicator. One difficulty associated with drywall ceilings is the necessity of framing in duct work.
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